Tag Archives: phonology

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A spectrographic study of sound changes in nineteenth century Kent. 2017. In Tsudzuki, Masaki & Masaki Taniguchi (eds), A Festschrift for Jack Windsor Lewis on the occasion of his 90th Birthday 215-246, Journal of the English Phonetic Society of Japan … Continue reading

Posted in Accents, Articulation, Consonants, Dialects, English, Kent, Pronunciation, rhoticity, RP, Vowels | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

19th century sound change in Kent: LOT

The distribution of LOT pronunciations by the seven informants. Most still had [a~ɑ]-like earlier pronunciations (O). Only two had as yet acquired the new pronunciation [ɔ] (N). The earlier 19th century popular pronunciation in Kent for LOT was [a~ɑ]. The … Continue reading

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Vowel articulation: Tongue height and backing

An ever-present issue is tongue height and backness as a reference frame for vowel articulation. This is not new. The inadequacy of height and backness has been well known but largely disregarded for at least 85 years, since Russell (1928, … Continue reading

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Kent Accent in the 19th Century: BATH

Throughout the 19th century, and presumably back to the time of the TRAP-BATH split, the timbre of the BATH vowel in Kent had been a bright [aː]-like quality, roughly in the vacant central open position on an IPA vowel diagram … Continue reading

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Remembering Gösta Bruce

An international Symposium on Prosody to commemorate the life and work of the late Gösta Bruce (1947-2010) is being held at the Lund University Centre for Language and Literature on 2-3 June, 2014. The symposium web page is here. Photo: … Continue reading

Posted in Dialects, Prosody, Remembrance, Swedish | Tagged , , , ,

Southern British English 1

  1. Estuary English before Rosewarne Some 25 years ago I was confronted with an enigmatic comment “You do this new thing awfully well”, followed by a necessary explanation, “the way you speak”. That new thing? What new thing? I’d … Continue reading

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Rhoticity in Lancashire 2: Southport to Rochdale

This page continues from the first part of this series, which has the introduction, definition of rhoticity, and the report for Area A (Liverpool-Manchester). This page reports Area B (Southport, Chorley, Bolton, Rochdale). Briefly, the sound examples are taken from … Continue reading

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Correlation and causality: ejectives

Spurious correlations “Recent studies have been uncovering some surprising links between cultural traits. For example, between chocolate consumption and the number of Nobel laureates a country produces, between the number of phonemes in a language and distance from East Africa, … Continue reading

Posted in Articulation, Caucasia, Caucasus, Consonants, Ejectives, English, Methods | Tagged , , , ,

Rhoticity in Lancashire: Liverpool – Manchester

The aim of this article is to check some on-line sources  for evidence of changing habits of rhoticity in Lancashire accents. Rhoticity is concerned with the pronunciation of the consonant r. In English, rhotic speakers pronounce all instances of /r/, … Continue reading

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